Grade 6 Math

Welcome to our Math program!

January Geometry Goals:

  • Students can sort and classify quadrilaterals by geometric properties related to symmetry, angles, and sides, through investigation using a variety of tools (e.g., geoboard, dynamic geometry software) and strategies (e.g., using charts, using Venn diagrams)
  • Students can sort polygons according to the number of lines of symmetry and the order of rotational symmetry, through investigation using a variety of tools (e.g., tracing paper, dynamic geometry software, Mira)
  • Students can measure and construct angles up to 180° using a protractor, and classify them as acute, right, obtuse, or straight angles
  • Students can construct polygons using a variety of tools, given angle and side measurements. Students can use dynamic geometry software to construct trapezoids with a 45° angle and a side measuring 11 cm.)
  • Students can build three-dimensional models using connecting cubes, given isometric sketches or different views (i.e., top, side, front) of the structure.
  • Students can sketch, using a variety of tools (e.g., isometric dot paper, dynamic geometry software), isometric perspectives and different views (top, side, front) of three-dimensional figures built with interlocking cubes.

December Data Management Goals:

  • Students can explain how different scales used on graphs can influence conclusions drawn from the data
  • Students can explain how data from charts, tables, and graphs can be used to make inferences and convincing arguments (e.g., use data to argue the impact of changing climate)
  • Students can select an appropriate type of graph to represent a set of data, graph the data using technology, and justify the choice of graph (e.g., pictographs, horizontal or vertical bar graphs, stem-and-leaf plots, double bar graphs, broken-line graphs, and continuous line graphs)
  • Students can demonstrate an understanding of mean (e.g., mean differs from median and mode because it is a value that “balances” a set of data and uses the mean to compare two sets of related data, with and without the use of technology. Students will use the mean to compare the number of novels read by students from two or more Grade 6 classes.)

November Data Management Goals:

  • Students can collect data by conducting a survey (e.g., use an Internet survey tool) to do with themselves, their environment, issues in their school, or content from another subject, and record observations or measurements
  • Students can read, interpret, and draw conclusions from primary data and from secondary data, presented in charts, tables, and graphs
  • Students can compare different graphical representations of the same data. Students will use technology to help compare the different types of graphs that can be created to represent a set of data about the number of runs or goals scored against each team in a tournament.
  • Students can collect and organize discrete or continuous primary data and secondary data (e.g., electronic data from websites such as E-Stat or Census At Schools) and display the data in charts, tables, and graphs (including continuous line graphs) that have appropriate titles, labels and scales, using a variety of tools (e.g., graph paper, spreadsheets, software)
  • Students can determine, through investigation, how well a set of data represents a population, on the basis of the method that was used to collect the data (reliability of data)

October-November Measurement Goals:

  • Students can use the metric system to estimate, measure, and record length and area
  • Students can select and justify the appropriate metric unit (i.e., millimetre, centimetre, decimetre, metre, decametre, kilometre) to measure length or distance in real-life situations
  • Students can construct a rectangle, a square, a triangle, and a parallelogram, using a variety of tools (e.g., concrete materials, graph paper)
  • Students can investigate the relationship between the area of a rectangle and the areas of parallelograms and triangles, by decomposing (e.g., cutting up a parallelogram into a rectangle and two congruent triangles) and composing (e.g., combining two congruent triangles to form a parallelogram)
  • Students can develop the formulas for the area of a parallelogram (i.e., Area of parallelogram = base x height) and the area of a triangle [i.e., Area of triangle = (base x height) ÷ 2], using the area relationships among rectangles, parallelograms, and triangles
  • Students can solve problems involving the estimation and calculation of the areas of triangles and the areas of parallelograms, as well as the surface area of triangular prisms and rectangular prisms
  • Students can use polydrons to help determine the process of calculating the surface area of rectangular and triangular prisms

October Numeracy Goals:

  • Students can identify composite numbers and prime numbers, and explain the relationship between them
  • Students can explain the need for a standard order for performing operations, by investigating the impact that changing the order has when performing a series of operations (Sample problem: Calculate and compare the answers to 3 + 2 x 5 using a basic four function calculator and using a scientific calculator)
  • Students can solve problems involving the multiplication and division of whole numbers (four digit by two-digit), using a variety of tools (e.g., concrete materials, drawings, calculators) and strategies (e.g., estimation, algorithms)
  • Students can use estimation when solving problems involving the multiplication and division of whole numbers, to help judge the reasonableness of a solution
  • Students can use a variety of mental strategies to solve multiplication and division problems involving whole numbers

September Numeracy Goals:

  • Students can represent, compare, order, add and subtract whole numbers and decimals ranging from 0.001 to 1 000 000
  • Students can read and print in words whole numbers to one hundred thousand, using the Internet and reference books as reference points
  • Students can use estimation when solving problems involving the addition and subtraction of whole numbers and decimals, to help judge the reasonableness of a solution
  • Students can use a variety of mental strategies to solve addition and subtraction problems involving whole numbers, to help judge the reasonableness of a solution
  • Students can solve problems that arise from real-life situations and that relate to the magnitude of whole numbers up to 1 000 000
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